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Student Opportunities

PhD Scholarship at University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

PhD Scholarship at UNSW (Oceanography/Applied Mathematics)

A prestigious Scientia PhD scholarship is available on a competitive basis to a highachieving talented student for the following research project at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia:

Changes in ocean ventilation: deconvolutions of hydrographic data and modeling

The scholarship pays $40k per year for 4 years, with additional support for travel and career development of up to $10k per year. For international students, tuition will be covered for the 4-year period.

The successful applicant will perform cutting-edge research to quantify changes in ocean ventilation, which is the exchange of water between the surface and interior of the ocean. Ocean ventilation is a key factor in the carbon and energy balance of the climate system. How the ventilation of the ocean is changing in response to changes in atmospheric forcing is one of the most important questions in climate science.

This PhD project aims to unlock the information that changes in ocean ventilation imprint on observed tracers such as dissolved gases, nutrients, radiocarbon, temperature, and salinity. By applying novel inversion techniques to new hydrographic data collected under the international GO-SHIP initiative and to historical data from the 1990s and 2000s, decadal changes in ventilation and their effect on heat and carbon uptake will be quantified. To understand the dynamics driving the changes that the data inversions will reveal, the student will also have the opportunity to conduct and/or analyse numerical experiments with state-of-the-art ocean models.

The supervisory team consists of Mark Holzer, Darryn Waugh, and Matthew England. The successful applicant will have the opportunity to interact with researchers in theSchool of Mathematics and in the Climate Change Research Centre at UNSW, as well as internationally.

The ideal candidate will be a highly motivated independent thinker with a strong background in applied mathematics and physics or in a closely allied field. A strong academic background as evidenced by a high GPA is a must, as are excellent communication skills, particularly the ability to write with clarity and concision. Prior research experience and authorship on published research articles would be a definite asset. The candidate should have a clear vision of how their PhD research experience will fit into their broader career plans.

Interested applicants must apply online at https://www.2025.unsw.edu.au/apply/as soon as possible and no later than July 20, 2018. In addition, applicants should contact the supervisors (mholzer@unsw.edu.au) with an email containing a CV, a brief statement of research interests, and a copy of their academic transcript. Suitable applicants for this project will then complete a formal PhD application together with the supervisory team for submission to the Scientia selection process.

PhD position in Mercury Biogeochemistry in Oxygen Minimum Zones 

PhD position in Mercury Biogeochemistry in Oxygen Minimum Zones 

Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) & Geosciences Environment Toulouse (GET

Fully-funded PhD Position 

The Marseille Marine Mercury Laboratory at the Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) and the Mercury Isotopes Group at Geosciences Environment Toulouse (GET) are seeking to recruit a scientist for a fully-funded 3-year PhD position to work at at the frontiers of trace metal oceanography, analytical sciences, stable isotopes biogeochemistry, and ecology. This PhD position is funded via the ANR (Agence Nationale de la Recherche) MERTOX project (2017-21) “Unraveling the origin of methylMERcury TOXin in marine ecosystems” (PI David Point, GET). 

Mercury is global pollutant and a neurotoxin with a serious health risk for humans, mainly via the consumption of marine fish. Anthropogenic Hg emissions have largely altered natural Hg levels. Bacteria feeding on sinking marine organic matter in the mesopelagic zone are thought to produce the toxic methylmercury species (MMHg) that bioaccumulates along the marine trophic chain to harmful levels. This main goal of this PhD project to study mercury biogeochemistry in oxygen minimum zones (OMZ), and to develop new stable isotope tools for a better understanding of the marine biogeochemical Hg cycle. The MERTOX case study will be conducted in the Peruvian Humboldt OMZ, which is very productive, exhibits extreme redox gradients, and is known to enhance in situ MeHg production. This region accounts for 15% of worldwide commercial fisheries while representing 0.1% of the global ocean surface. Peruvian anchovy fisheries contribute to more than half of world landings used for fishmeal production and then fuels a critical portion of world aquaculture production. The MERTOX field campaigns are planned for April and August 2019, along several cruise transects covering the strong inshore/offshore organic matter gradients and steep shallow redox fronts. The cruises will be performed on board of IMARPE’s R/V Olaya and will be supported by bi-annual transect surveys. Complementary physical (salinity, temperature,..), chemical (macronutrients, Fe, Mn, CH4, HS-), microbiological (diversity, HgcAB methylating genes) and ecological (phytoplankton speciation, Chl-a,…) data will be gathered. The main field tasks of the PhD student is to sample and measure the full suite of Hg species (MMHg, DMHg, Hg°, Hg2+, pHg, pMMHg), perform isotopically labelled incubation experiments, and contribute to the isotopic measurement of both the Carbon (δ13C), and Hg (δ202Δ199Hg) atoms of the MeHg (CH3Hg) molecule, along the trophic chain (seawater, phyto-, zooplankton,…). 

The PhD student will be based at the MIO (Lars-Eric Heimbürger, Sophie Bonnet, Marseille, France) and will closely collaborate with the GET laboratory (David Point, Jeroen Sonke, Toulouse, France) for stable isotopic analysis, the LMD/IPSL (Laurent Bopp, Paris, France) for biogeochemical modeling, the LEMAR (Anne Lorrain, Brest, France) for ecological/trophic web investigations, and the IMARPE (Michelle Graco, Lima, Peru) for the specifics of the biogeochemistry of the Humboldt OMZ and field work . 

MIO is a joint research unit of AMU, CNRS, Institute of Research for Development (IRD) and University of Toulon (UTLN). MIO’s objectives are to better understand the ocean system and its response to global change, with expertise in chemical, physical and (micro-)biological oceanography. MIO has infrastructures at 5 sites: AMU Luminy, UTLN, the IFREMER marine base in La Seyne-sur-Mer and the IRD Centre in Nouméa, New Caledonia. MIO is structured in 5 disciplinary teams, with 6 cross-thematic research areas and 6 analytical platforms, a marine monitoring service supported by its own research vessel Antedon II, which will be used for method development. 

The Marseille Marine Mercury Laboratory at MIO is fully equipped for basic and advanced Hg analysis: cold vapor atomic fluorescence spectrometry (3x CV-AFS Brook Rand), an automated total Hg analyzer purge & trap CV-AFS (Brooks Rand MERX-T), an automated methylHg analyzer purge & trap GC-CV-AFS (Brooks Rand MERX-M, an automated combustion atomic absorption spectrometry AAS (Leco AMA 254), and a brand-new gas chromatography (Thermo Trace 1300) coupled to the HR-ICPMS (Thermo Element XR) for Hg speciation by isotope dilution. One fulltime dedicated technician manages daily operations and maintenance of these facilities. 

The PhD student will be trained in ultra-trace clean techniques, participate in several field campaigns, help with the validation and interpretation of all acquired data, help with the implementation of the data into numerical models and contribute to the publication of the findings. The PhD student will be lead author of at least 2 publications. 

The PhD student will potentially be involved in another Pacific Ocean cruise in November-December 2019, as part of the submitted ANR proposal TONGA (PIs Sophie Bonnet, MIO, Cecile Guieu, LOV, Villefranche sur Mer) as part of the international GEOTRACES program. A qualification comparable to a Master's degree or Diploma in chemistry, environmental chemistry, (chemical) oceanography or related field is required. Experience in analytical chemistry and / or marine biogeochemistry is desirable. An essential requirement for selection for the PhD projects is a top-quality MSc or equivalent 4–5 year degree. We also expect good English language skills, and that the candidate is willing and able to participate in sea-going expeditions. Most importantly, we are looking for a creative and curious mind. Applications including a letter of motivation, CV and contact details of 2 referees should be sent to heimburger@lars-eric.com as a single pdf file, using as email subject "PhD OMZ Hg". 

PhD supervisors Dr. Lars-Eric Heimbürger, Dr. Sophie Bonnet (HDR) Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Aix Marseille University, CNRS/INSU, Université de Toulon, IRD, Marseille, France 

Dr. David Point Geosciences Environment Toulouse, Observatoire Midi-Pyrénées, CNRS/IRD/Université Paul-Sabatier, Toulouse, France 

PhD position in Mediterranean Mercury Modeling, LSCE & MIO, France 

PhD position in Mediterranean Mercury Modeling, LSCE & MIO, France 

The Laboratory of Climate and Environmental Sciences (LSCE, Paris, France) and the Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO, Marseilles, France) are offering a 

PhD Position 

Topic: Modeling the biogeochemical mercury cycle in the Mediterranean Sea. 

Starting on October 1st 2018 

Job Description / Duties 

The Mediterranean Sea is under the influence of anthropogenic emissions and changing climate, both affecting the biogeochemical mercury cycle. This oligotrophic basin, limited by macronutrients (P, N), mainly receives supply via atmospheric deposition, upwelling of deep waters and rivers. 

The PhD objective is to investigate the impact of climate change and atmospheric forcing on the Mediterranean Sea and its marine biogeochemistry. The strategy is based on the use and analysis of 3D atmospheric and oceanic models, especially the regional coupled NEMOMed-PISCES model that simulates the dynamics and biogeochemical cycles of the Mediterranean at high resolution (1/12°). This study is part of the national MISTRALS and the international GEOTRACES programs. 

Firstly, we will study the evolution of the biogeochemical cycling according to different IPCC climate change scenarios. We will simulate the response of the changes in forcing (temperature, circulation), nutrient supply (atmospheric dust deposition, rivers), and nutrient redistribution (circulation) on primary production, and the first trophic levels (phyto- and zooplankton). The numerical modeling efforts will be supported by recently acquired in situ observations, including a Saharan dust event, aduring the 2017 GEOTRACES PEACETIME cruise. 

Secondly, we will attempt to simulate for the first time the complex biogeochemical cycle of mercury (Hg), resolving all Hg species (MMHg, DMHg, Hg°, Hg2+, pHg, pMMHg) in the Mediterranean Sea. Mercury is global pollutant and a neurotoxin with a serious health risk for humans, mainly via the consumption of marine fish. Anthropogenic Hg emissions have largely altered natural Hg levels. Bacteria feeding on sinking marine organic matter in the mesopelagic zone are thought to produce the toxic methylmercury species (MMHg) that bioaccumulates along the marine trophic chain to harmful levels. The direct links of anthropogenic Hg emissions and changing climate to marine fish Hg levels, and ultimately human exposure remain ill-understood. 

The Mediterranean Sea is one of the best covered areas in terms of observational Hg data (Cossa et al. 1991, 1994, 1997, 2017a,b, Horvat et al. 2003, 2005, Kotnik et al. 2007, 2009, Heimbürger et al. 2010). The data comprises over 800 data points and the new data acquired during the 2017 GEOTRACES PEACETIME cruise added another 200 data points. The wealth of observational Hg data and the well-studied circulation and biogeochemistry (MERMEX group, 2011) make the Mediterranean Sea the ideal place to implement marine biogeochemical models (Ayache et al., 2016). 

The PhD student will based at the Laboratoire du Sciences du Climat et d’Environnement (LSCE) and collaborate intensely with the Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO) in Marseilles, France. S/he will help with the validation and interpretation of all acquired data and be in charge of the implementation of the data into numerical models. The PhD student will be lead author of at least 2 publications. Although the data for PhD project is already acquired, the student will be given the opportunity to learn about the observational aspects, ultra-trace clean techniques, participate to field campaigns. 

Qualification 

A qualification comparable to a Master's degree or Diploma in (chemical) oceanography, environmental chemistry, or related field is required. Experience in programming and numerical modeling is a requirement, and notations in marine biogeochemistry are desirable. An essential requirement for selection for the PhD projects is a top-quality MSc or equivalent 5 year degree. We also expect good English language skills. 

Applications including a letter of motivation, CV and contact details of 3 referees should be sent to jean-claude.dutay@lsce.ipsl.fr and lars-eric.heimburger@mio.osupytheas.fr as a single pdf file, using as subject "MED Hg modeling". 

Dr. Jean-Claude Dutay SCE, IPSL/CEA, UVSQ, CNRS, University Paris-Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France 

Dr. Lars-Eric Heimbürger 

Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, Aix Marseille University, CNRS/INSU, Université de Toulon, IRD, UM 110, 13288, Marseille, France 

Evaluation will close end of April. 


References 

Ayache, M., J. C. Dutay, T. Arsouze, S. Révillon, J. Beuvier and C. Jeandel (2016). "High-resolution neodymium characterization along the Mediterranean margins and modelling of εNd distribution in the Mediterranean basins." Biogeosciences 13(18): 5259-5276. 

Cossa, D., B. Averty and N. Pirrone (2009). "The origin of methylmercury in open Mediterranean waters." Limnology and Oceanography 54(3): 837-844. 

Cossa, D. and M. Coquery, Eds. (2005). The Mediterranean Mercury Anomaly, a Geochemical or a Biological Issue. The Mediterranean Sea. Berlin-Heidelberg, Springer. 

Cossa, D., X. Durrieu de Madron, J. Schäfer, S. Guédron, N. Marusczak, S. Castelle and J.-J. Naudin (2017). "Sources and exchanges of mercury in the waters of the Northwestern Mediterranean margin." Progress in Oceanography. 

Cossa, D., X. Durrieu de Madron, J. Schäfer, L. Lanceleur, S. Guédron, R. Buscail, B. Thomas, S. Castelle and J.-J. Naudin (2017). "The open sea as the main source of methylmercury in the water column of the Gulf of Lions (Northwestern Mediterranean margin)." Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 199(Supplement C): 222-237. 

Cossa, D. and J.-M. Martin (1991). "Mercury in the Rhône delta and adjacent marine areas." Marine Chemistry 36(1–4): 291-302. 

Cossa, D., J. M. Martin and J. Sanjuan (1994). "Dimethylmercury Formation in the Alboran Sea." Marine Pollution Bulletin 28(6): 381-384. 

Cossa, D., J. M. Martin, K. Takayanagi and J. Sanjuan (1997). "The distribution and cycling of mercury species in the western Mediterranean." Deep-Sea Research II 44(3-4): 721-740. 

Durrieu de Madron, X., C. Guieu, R. Sempéré, P. Conan, D. Cossa, F. D’Ortenzio, C. Estournel, F. Gazeau, C. Rabouille, L. Stemmann, S. Bonnet, F. Diaz, P. Koubbi, O. Radakovitch, M. Babin, M. Baklouti, C. Bancon-Montigny, S. Belviso, N. Bensoussan, B. Bonsang, I. Bouloubassi, C. Brunet, J. F. Cadiou, F. Carlotti, M. Chami, S. Charmasson, B. Charrière, J. Dachs, D. Doxaran, J. C. Dutay, F. Elbaz-Poulichet, M. Eléaume, F. Eyrolles, C. Fernandez, S. Fowler, P. Francour, J. C. Gaertner, R. Galzin, S. Gasparini, J. F. Ghiglione, J. L. Gonzalez, C. Goyet, L. Guidi, K. Guizien, L. E. Heimbürger, S. H. M. Jacquet, W. H. Jeffrey, F. Joux, P. Le Hir, K. Leblanc, D. Lefèvre, C. Lejeusne, R. Lemé, M. D. Loÿe-Pilot, M. Mallet, L. Méjanelle, F. Mélin, C. Mellon, B. Mérigot, P. L. Merle, C. Migon, W. L. Miller, L. Mortier, B. Mostajir, L. Mousseau, T. Moutin, J. Para, T. Pérez, A. Petrenko, J. C. Poggiale, L. Prieur, M. Pujo-Pay, V. Pulido, P. Raimbault, A. P. Rees, C. Ridame, J. F. Rontani, D. Ruiz Pino, M. A. Sicre, V. Taillandier, C. Tamburini, T. Tanaka, I. Taupier-Letage, M. Tedetti, P. Testor, H. Thébault, B. Thouvenin, F. Touratier, J. Tronczynski, C. Ulses, F. Van Wambeke, V. Vantrepotte, S. Vaz and R. Verney (2011). "Marine ecosystems’ responses to climatic and anthropogenic forcings in the Mediterranean." Progress in Oceanography 91(2): 97-166. 

Heimbürger, L. E., D. Cossa, J.-C. Marty, C. Migon, B. Averty, A. Dufour and J. Ras (2010). "Methylmercury distributions in relation to the presence of nano- and picophytoplankton in an oceanic water column (Ligurian Sea, North-western Mediterranean)." Geochimica Et Cosmochimica Acta 74(19): 5549-5559. 

Horvat, M., J. Kotnik, M. Logar, V. Fajon, T. Zvonaric and N. Pirrone (2003). "Speciation of mercury in surface and deep-sea waters in the Mediterranean Sea." Atmospheric Environment 37(Supplement 1): 93-108. 

Kotnik, J., M. Horvat, E. Tessier, N. Ogrinc, M. Monperrus, D. Amouroux, V. Fajon, D. Gibicar, S. Zizek, F. Sprovieri and N. Pirrone (2007). "Mercury speciation in surface and deep waters of the Mediterranean Sea." Marine Chemistry 107(1): 13-30. 

Graduate student (PhD) positions available in trace metal biogeochemistry at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

Graduate student (PhD) positions available in trace metal biogeochemistry at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences

Research projects:

1) Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) in the Northern Gulf of Alaska (NGA)
The Northern Gulf of Alaska is a subpolar biome characterized by enhanced productivity and high environmental variability. This project is part of the new NGA LTER site and focuses on understanding the processes that control macro- and micro-nutrient dynamics and their role on the pronounced spring bloom and the regions of sustained summer primary production. Observations will take place during 3 yearly cruises from spring to fall.

The student will be responsible for collecting and processing seawater and suspended particulate samples during cruises and determining micro-nutrient concentrations using UAF’s ICPMS facility which includes a SeaFast system and an Element2 HR-ICPMS. Results will be interpreted within the LTER framework which will require collaboration with the interdisciplinary LTER research community. The student will be required to present work at international conferences, and to produce publishable manuscripts. Full funding is available for three years for a PhD student.

2)  Chemical, Physical and Biological processes linking snow and sea ice to the Arctic Ocean mixed layer Sea ice is a major component of the polar oceans. It serves as an important platform for the accumulation and transport of dissolved and particulate material derived from atmospheric deposition, fluid exchange with the underlying ocean, sediment inclusions, and biological activity. This project is part of the international MOSAiC platform study and focuses on sea ice processes that affect macro- and micro-nutrient cycling in the Arctic Ocean. Observations will take place during several multi-month deployments in 2019.

The student will be responsible for collecting samples during one of the deployments and determining dissolved and particulate micro-nutrient concentrations in snow, sea ice and seawater for the project. Analysis will take place at UAF’s ICPMS facility which includes a SeaFast system and an Element2 HR-ICPMS. Results will be interpreted within the MOSAiC framework and will be used to help constrain models. This will require collaboration with the MOSAiC research community. The student will be required to present work at international conferences, and to produce publishable manuscripts. Full funding is available for three years for a PhD student.

Candidates: Applicants are expected to have a strong background in chemistry and/or oceanography, analytical chemistry experience, and strong written and oral communication skills. Experience participating in field research, working in clean laboratory facilities and/or experience with ICPMS analysis is desirable, but not required. Underrepresented students are encouraged to apply.


The UAF College of Fisheries and Marine Science is located in Fairbanks Alaska. UAF is America’s Arctic University and a Land, Sea, and Space Grant Institution. The University of Alaska is an AA/EO employer and educational institution and prohibits illegal discrimination against any individual: www.alaska.edu/nondiscrimination/.

Apply online and view college requirements at
http://www.uaf.edu/cfos/academics/graduate/oceanography/

Deadline: Applications must be received before June 30, 2018.

Advisor: Ana Aguilar-Islas. For additional information email (amaguilarislas@alaska.edu)

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